Category: Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular Health

This report is meant for general information. It is not as a substitute for diagnosis or treatment. If you suspect that you have a health problem, see your physician. This is one area in which, if you suspect problems, you want to do a more traditional cardiac workup or make a referral to a cardiologist. Read More …

Whole Grains and Heart Failure

An article appearing in the Archives of Internal Medicine (Vol. 167, Number 19) covered results from the Physican’s Health Study I. It followed over 21,000 men for nearly 20 years, looking at both their eating habits and health. Over the course of the study, the researchers found 1018 cases of heart failure. After adjusting for Read More …

Whole Grains and Cardiovascular Risk

Research appearing in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (Vol. 87, No. 1, 79-90, January 2008) showed that consumption of whole grains instead of refined grains can reduce abdominal fat and lower CRP levels.  CRP is C-Reactive Protein. When it is high, it indicates inflammation and an increased cardiovascular risk. The subjects were 50 obese Read More …

Vitamin Intake and Cardiovascular Disease

Research appearing in Nutrition, Metabolism, and Cardiovascular Diseases (2005; 15(3):188-97) looked at nutrient intake in 755 male and female subjects aged 66-99 years and correlated it with the incidence of heart attack and stroke.Dietary histories were taken and vitamins and mineral levels in the serum were analyzed. The researchers found that low vitamin D intake Read More …

Vitamin E and the Heart

There are many ways that vitamin E can protect the heart. It prevents the oxidation of LDL (low density lipoprotein—the so called “bad cholesterol”). It is the oxidation of the LDL that forms plaque on the arteries. Vitamin E will also prevent platelet aggregation. Clots are formed by platelet aggregation; so this is another way Read More …

Vitamin C Protects Against Heart Disease

Archives  Family Medicine September 1994, 3:809-820 Atherosclerotic plaques may be caused by oxidation of LDL (the so called “bad cholesterol”). Antioxidant nutrients may prevent or delay oxidation and plaque formation. There is some evidence that vitamin E may decrease the oxidation of LDL. Vitamin C may play a role because it helps to regenerate oxidized Read More …

Trans fats and vitamin deficient diets undermine our health

Trans fats are found in a lot of snack foods like chips, fries, cookies, crackers and breads. They are found in hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils. The foods with hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils also tend to be made with refined white flour. There is evidence, according to research published in the November, 2004 issue Read More …

Sunshine Protects the Heart

Research appearing in the Archives of Internal Medicine (Vol. 168 No. 12, June 23, 2008) showed that low serum level of vitamin D is linked to an increase in mortality from cardiovascular problems. The subjects of the study were over 3200 German men and women averaging 62 years of age. Blood levels of vitamin D Read More …

Subclinical Hypothyroidism Increases Heart Disease Risk in Older Women

Hypothyroidism has been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Now, research appearing in the Annals of Internal Medicine (2000; 132(4):270-8) shows that subclinical hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmunity can also increase the risk of heart disease. In subclinical hypothyroidism, patients do not have the symptoms of hypothyroidism, but their blood tests indicate an Read More …

Stroke Risk Reduced by Eating Fruits and Vegetables

A study appearing in The Lancet (Vol. 367, Issue 9507, 28 January 2006) looked at eight other studies and the impact eating fruits and vegetables had on the likelihood of stroke. The study analyzed research involving over 250,000 people from the US, Japan and Europe. It found that people who ate five or more servings Read More …