Category: Back and Neck Pain

Natural Health Care and Back Pain

Pain in the back and neck can affect your health on  deeper levels, beyond the discomfort that they create. There are many natural approaches to  back and neck pain, including chiropractic, acupuncture, naturopathy, and (many people are surprised at this–nutrition) Muscle Balance Affects Health Muscle imbalance can create poor posture and stresses the body and Read More …

Vitamin D deficiency may be linked to chronic pain

Vitamin D Deficiency may be Linked to Chronic Pain According to the Mayo Clinic Proceedings (December 9, 2003), vitamin D deficiency is one possible cause of persistent and vague musculoskeltal pain. A study of 150 children and adults suffering from vague musculoskeletal pain performed at the University of Minnesota found that 93% of the subjects Read More …

Stress and low back pain linked

In a study published in the American Journal of Public Health (October 2001; 91:1671-1678), researchers interviewed 6,000 subjects about a number of physical and psychological issues. They interviewed the subjects twice, once when the group was 23 years old and again when they were 33. About 10% of the group experienced low back pain for Read More …

Steroids and Spinal Problems

A study published in the October, 2000 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, indicates that people over the age of 60 who take corticosteroids for longer than six months have a greater risk of developing spinal deformities. Corticosteroids are commonly prescribed for autoimmune diseases and other inflammatory conditions. Steroids are known to cause bone Read More …

Smoking Contributes to Pain

Research appearing in the journal, Spine (Dec. 1, 1999:24(23), pp2492-96) found that teenagers who smoked experienced back pain twice as often as those who did not smoke. The subjects of the study were high school students form Montreal, Canada.

Pain Tolerance Improves With Age

Pain Tolerance Improves With Age Researchers at the University of Michigan and the University of South Florida say that older people are better at tolerating chronic pain than young adults. Subjects of the study included nearly 6,000 adults. It found that the subjects under the age of 50 were less able to cope with chronic Read More …

Pain Medication may be Linked to Kidney Failure

Pain Medications May be Linked to Kidney Failure People with kidney disease or other ailments who regularly take aspirin or acetaminophen may be increasing the risk of developing kidney failure. Patients who regularly use pain medications (according to researchers, regular use is defined as at least twice each week for two months), were between two Read More …

Pain medication increases chance of kidney failure

People with kidney disease who regularly take aspirin or acetaminophen may increase their risk of developing kidney failure, According to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine (December 20, 2001;345:1801-1808) the use of aspirin or acetaminophen may increase the risk of kidney failure in those with existing kidney disease. Kidney patients who took Read More …

Pain medication can increase the risk for a second bout of heart failure

Pain Medication Can Increase the Risk of a Second Bout of Heart Failure Popular anti-inflammatory, pain-killing drugs (called NSAIDs—or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) may increase the risk of relapse in patients with heart failure according to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine (February 11, 2002;162:265-270). NSAIDs, a group of drugs that includes aspirin Read More …

Pain costs

According to the National Institute of Health pain costs more that $100 billion each year in America. This reflects the combined costs of treatment and lost productivity. More than 25 percent of men and women who live with chronic pain report that this condition affected their decision to quit their job. According to “Gender Attitudes Read More …