Category: Herbs

ALOE

From the Arabic “alloeh” meaning bitter and shiny. It is a member of the lily family. It is a good treatment for burns and wounds, just apply the juice of the plant directly to the lesion. Many people have aloe plants in their home and just break a leaf and apply the juice from the Read More …

Turmeric for Arthritis

Research appearing in Arthritis & Rheumatism (2006;54(11):3452-3464) shows that an extract of turmeric may be helpful to arthritis sufferers. Earlier studies on rats had shown that turmeric could prevent joint inflammation. It also inhibited joint destruction and inhibited osteoclasts (cells that break down bone). The current study was conducted to see if a commercially available Read More …

Turmeric and Curcumin

Turmeric is a perennial plant, botanically related to ginger that is native to India, Chinaand Indonesia. It is a component of curry powder and prepared mustard. It is used in traditional Chinese medicine and in Indian (Ayurvedic) medicine for its anti-inflammatory properties. It has been used to treat digestive disturbance, menstrual difficulties, pain and protecting Read More …

Scientists study herb

Scientists Study Herb’s Anti-Migraine Properties According to researchers from Yale, they may know how the herb feverfew works to relieve migraines. The herb has substance known as parthenolide. Pathenolide targets a protein called I kappaB Kinase, which may be involved in inflammation. The researchers made a derivative of parthenolide and found that it bound I Read More …

Quercitin Helps Lower Blood Pressure

Quercitin is a bioflavonol found in onions, apples and other produce. A recent study appearing in the Journal of Nutrition (Nov. 2007; Vol 137) found that it may have a blood pressure lowering effect. Of the 41 people who participated in the study, 22 were hypertensive, with average blood pressure of 146/96 and 19 were Read More …

Herbs for Back Pain?

According to a research review  appearing in The Cochraine Library, back pain responds to certain herbs (Gagnier, J. The Cochrane Library, 2006; Issue 2, NationalCenter for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: “Herbal Supplements: Consider Safety, Too.”). The studies under review involved a total of over 1,500 subjects. A standardized 50 mg. dose of devil’s claw outperformed Read More …

Herbs are Good for Women’s Health

An article appearing in the Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association (40(2):234-242, 2000) took a look at research involving herbs used for women’s health. The author, Mary L. Hardy, MD is medical director, Cedars-Sinai Integrative Medicine Medical Group, Cedars-SinaiHospital, and associate clinical professor of medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. According to Dr. Hardy, Read More …

Herbs and Seasonings are Important Sources of Dietary Antioxidants

Herbs commonly used in the kitchen for seasoning are a good source of nutritional antioxidants, according to research published in the Journal of Nutrition (2003; 133(5):1286-90). Seasonings like sage, clove, oregano, lemon balm, peppermint, garden thyme, allspice and cinnamon are very high in antioxidants. Antioxidants exist in very high concentrations in the seasonings (greater than Read More …

Ginkgo protects the brain after a stroke in mice

According to a report presented to the AmericanAcademy of Neurology in April, 2000, Ginkgo biloba, reduces the extent of brain damage caused by stroke induced in mice. Because of some positive results in cancer and dementia research, researches have tired to reduce damage from destructive molecules called free radicals. Free radical damage occurs after a Read More …

Ginger and Nausea

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a perennial plant that grows in warm and humid climates. The rhizome (a thickened, usually horizontal underground stem or branch of a plant that stores food) of ginger has been used in cooking and medicinally for centuries. Ginger has traditionally been used in Chinaand in other cultures to treat nausea, vomiting Read More …