Category: Mental Health

Is it Alzeheimers of is it B12

Mark Goodman Ph.D. has some interesting observations of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He believes that many patients diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease actually have dementia caused by a lack of vitamin B12. Dr. Goodman has an accredited Ph.D. in behavioral medicine (with a specialization in clinical neuropsychology) from the University of  Maryland School of Medicine. Read More …

High homocysteine increases risk of dementia and alzheimer’s

Homocysteine is an amino acid that has shown to be linked to heart disease and osteoporosis. Homocysteine is normally converted by the body to cysteine and eventually taurine; amino acids that do not have the same negative implications. The conversion reactions that change homocysteine to the more benign amino acids are dependent on vitamins B6, Read More …

Foods rich in vitamin C helps mental health

According to a study of cognitive function funded by the National Institute on Aging, the brain is vulnerable to free radicals, which cause oxidative damage. Free radicals are like chemical “bullets” that can damage tissue (oxidative damage). The study followed change in mental function in 3000 people over the age of 64 living in Cache Read More …

Exposure to Pesticides Damages the Brain and the Nervous System

Research performed at the University of North Dakota at the Energy and Environmental Research Center, in conjunction with the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and several state and federal agencies, indicates found that pesticide exposure caused changes in the nervous systems of experimental rats. The researchers are working to identify Read More …

Exercise: Reduces Stress, Improves Mood and Increases Brain Power

Research appearing in the November 1999 issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine demonstrates the value exercise has for reducing stress. The subjects of the study were 135 college students. The study found that those who exercised regularly coped with stress better and had 37% fewer physical symptoms than those who did not exercise regularly. Read More …

Exercise, Nutrition and Depression

Exercise may be more beneficial for treating depression. There is research to support this idea. Research appearing in British Journal of Sports Medicine(April 2001;35:114-117) showed the benefit of exercise to depressed patients. It was a small study, involving 12 subjects. Each subject had a depressive episode as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Read More …

Exercise Curbs Depression

Research published in the May, 2006 issue of Family Practice News () studied 80 adults with mild to moderate depression. The subjects were placed randomly into one of five groups. Two of the groups did very low levels of exercise; one for three days per week and another for five days per week (7 kcal/kg/wk). Read More …

Exercise can Help with Depression

According to researchers at the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center, aerobic exercise can have a positive effect on mild to moderate depression. Adults aged 20 to 45 who exercised aerobically for 30 minutes, three to five times each week reduced depressive symptoms by nearly 50%/. This result compares favorably to antidepressant medication or cognitive Read More …

Emotions affect pain

TexasA&MUniversity psychologist Mary W. Meagher, who has conducted pain research for 16 years, says that fear and anxiety affect how a person experiences pain. Fear tends to reduce pain, anxiety increases it. She says, “From a clinical perspective, these data suggest that a patient anticipating an unpredictable threatening event will experience enhanced pain,” she says. Read More …

Electrical Stimulation of the Brain Improves Memory

German scientists, publishing research in the November, 2006 issue of the online journal, Nature have found that stimulating the brain during sleep improves memory. The subjects were asked to memorize pairs of words before sleep. During sleep, one group of the subjects received slow, oscillating electrical current that mimicked brain waves. The stimulation was low Read More …