Category: Exercise

Exercise is Beneficial to Fibromyalgia Patients

Fibromyalgia is more common in women (about 90% of cases). It is a chronic condition wherein the patient has muscular and joint pain. There are also specific tender points that occur in the neck, shoulders, hips and spine. The patient may also have other symptoms, including sleep disturbances, fatigue, depression or irritable bowel syndrome. Research Read More …

Exercise in Youth Improves Bone Health Later in Life

According to a study appearing in the July, 2006 issue of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism shows that men who are athletic in their teens enjoy bone-building benefits that persists even after the intense athletic activity has ceased. Researchers monitored 63 athletes and 27 non-athletes for eight years. The average age of the Read More …

Exercise Curbs Depression

Research published in the May, 2006 issue of Family Practice News () studied 80 adults with mild to moderate depression. The subjects were placed randomly into one of five groups. Two of the groups did very low levels of exercise; one for three days per week and another for five days per week (7 kcal/kg/wk). Read More …

Exercise can Help with Depression

According to researchers at the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center, aerobic exercise can have a positive effect on mild to moderate depression. Adults aged 20 to 45 who exercised aerobically for 30 minutes, three to five times each week reduced depressive symptoms by nearly 50%/. This result compares favorably to antidepressant medication or cognitive Read More …

Exercise and Yoga Helps MS Patients with Fatigue

According to a study appearing in the journal, Neurology (June 8, 2004;62(11):2058-64), yoga can be of benefit to MS patients. It was a small study, involving 69 subjects. The subjects were divided into three groups and evaluated over a six month period. One group rode a stationary bicycle; another attended a weekly 90 minute lyengar Read More …

Exercise and Stress

Exercise reduces physical problems due to stress. This makes sense because joint movement increases serotonin production. Serotoninis a neurotransmitter (a chemical that enables nerve cells—especially in the brain, to communicate with each other). Many anti-depressant drugs act to increase serotonin activity. According to a 1999 study published in Annals of Behavioral Medicine, people who exercise Read More …

Exercise and Breast Cancer Survival

Women who regularly exercised in the year before being diagnosed with breast cancer have into a higher survival rate compared to sedentary women, according to the journal Cancer (October 15, 2006). The study looked at data from women aged 20 to 54 who were diagnosed with breast cancer. The women were asked about how often Read More …

Exercise and Arthritis

When in pain it, exercise is often unthinkable. There is a natural tendency to want to rest a part of the body that is painful. Although beginning an exercise regimen is difficult for someone in pain, the benefits outweigh the initial difficulty, according to the article: “Moderate Exercise Prevents, Relieves Osteoarthritis” appearing in Family Practice Read More …

Chiropractic Good for Golfers

According to the Journal of the American Chiropractic Association, (August, 2000), golfers have learned that chiropractic can both improve their game and speed recovery from injuries. Tom La Fountain, DC, DABCO, has toured with the PGA. He states that up to 85% of the injuries on the PGA Tour and Senior Tour are spinal because Read More …

Brain Chemical Linked to the Desire to Exercise

The body’s response to a chemical found in the brain, orexin A, may be linked with the desire to exercise and may explain a difference between active people who are always on the go and couch potatoes. Research published in the American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, online August 14, 2006, Read More …