Category: Diet and Lifestyle

TV Viewing May Deter From Learning

Research appearing in July, 2005 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine shows that watching television can harm a child’s ability to learn. Several studies were looked at. One study looked at 400 Californian students in the third grad. It found that the students with televisions in their bedrooms scored an average of Read More …

Trans Fatty Acids and Heart Disease

According to research appearing in the European Journal of Medical Research, (2003; 8(8):355-7), consuming trans fatty acids increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Consumption of them can cause a decrease of HDL cholesterol (commonly called by lay people, the “good” cholesterol). Increasing consumption of trans fats to 10% of caloric energy decreased HDL by 21%. Read More …

Trans fats and vitamin deficient diets undermine our health

Trans fats are found in a lot of snack foods like chips, fries, cookies, crackers and breads. They are found in hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils. The foods with hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils also tend to be made with refined white flour. There is evidence, according to research published in the November, 2004 issue Read More …

The Power of Prayer

The Power of Prayer Research that appeared in Annals of Internal Medicine (2000;132:903-910) analyzed 23 earlier studies of “distance healing” (like prayer) and therapeutic touch (like the “laying on of hands’). Seven of the studies involved distance healing and 11 of the studies involved therapeutic touch. Therapeutic touch is based on the idea that the Read More …

The Link Between Alcohol and Allergies

Immunoglobulin E (IgE) is an antibody associated with allergies. The tendency to produce IgE antibodies to harmless antigens in the environment is increasing. Such antibody production seems to be increasing in the general population. Serum IgE levels can be increased by infection, parasites and exposure to environmental toxins. One of the toxins that seems to Read More …

The Cost of the Common Cold

According to research published in Archives of Internal Medicine (2003 Feb 24;163(4):487-94), viral upper respiratory infections that are not influenza (in other words, colds) cost the US economy $39.5 billion each year. A nationwide telephone survey of US households (N = 4051) was conducted betweenNovember 3, 2000, and February 12, 2001about frequency and treatment approach Read More …

Teddy bears and massage help with pain

Teddy Bears and Massage Help with Pain Findings in a project sponsored by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services show that methods for managing pain without drugs can be extremely effective. According to officials of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, early findings in the two-year project, conducted in nursing homes, indicate that Read More …

Tai Chi for Arthritis

Tai Chi can Benefit Arthritis Sufferers According to a pilot study, found in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship (May, 2001) by a doctoral student at Case Western Reserve University, Tai Chi can reduce arthritic pain. Tai Chi is gentle and slow, making a good exercise for the elderly. The study’s subjects were16 people, ages 68-87 Read More …

Sub Optimal Vitamin Intake Linked to Disease

According to an article appearing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (2002; 287(23):3127-9), many of us may need to be taking vitamin supplements. The article acknowledges that while extreme deficiency syndromes (like pellagra and beriberi) are rare in Western society, sub optimal intake of certain nutrients is a risk factor for disease. The Read More …

Stress Reduction to Treat Diabetes

According to research appearing in the January, 2002 issue of Diabetes Care, stress management can help to lower blood sugar levels in type II (adult onset) diabetics. The HbA1c test measures the average blood sugar levels over a period of time. There were 108 subjects in the study, aged 30 or above and all had Read More …