Category: Diabetes

Diet and Exercise Outperform Drugs in Type 2 Diabetes

According to research published in the New England Journal of Medicine (February 7, 2002; 346:393-403), shows that diet and exercise can reduce the risk of getting type 2 diabetes. About one adult in 12 in the United States has the disease. Type 2 diabetes is the result of the body becoming insensitive to insulin. Excess Read More …

Diabetes Risk is Related to the Type of Fat you Eat

According to research published in  the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition June 2001;73:1001-1002, 1019-1026, Trans fats, the kind found in a lot of packaged food, like cookies, crackers, certain dressings and much processed food can increase the risk for developing type II diabetes. Trans fats can be found in food with the words “hydrogenated oil” Read More …

Diabetes Costs Double

In 1997 the cost of health care for problems related to diabetes was $44 billion; in 2002 it more than doubled to $92 billion, according to the American Diabetes Association. This figure represents direct medical costs and not costs due to lost productivity. Diabetes is responsible for 180,000 deaths each year and an estimated 16 Read More …

Depression in Diabetics and Omega-3 Fatty Acids

In the journal, Diabetic Medicine (2005; 22(11): 1465-75) a review of research articles concerning depression in type 2 diabetics and essential fatty acids was conducted. Clinical studies and epidemiological studies, examining the association between omega-3 fatty acids and depression, and examining the use of omega-3 fatty acids by type 2 diabetics, showed an association between Read More …

About Diabetes

A high-fat diet causes glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Atherosclerosis is the most common complication of diabetes. There is strong evidence from primary prevention studies in non-diabetics that reduction in LDL (bad cholesterol) level and elevation in HDL (good cholesterol) level each reduces the risk of coronary artery disease. It is essential that physicians pay Read More …

Poor Diabetes Control Can Lead to Cognitive Difficulty

According to research appearing in Diabetes Care(August, 2006; 29: 1794-1799), elderly diabetics with poor blood sugar control may lead to cognitive dysfunction. Sixty patients, over the age of 70 were evaluated for cognitive dysfunction, using the Mini Mental State Examination and a clock-drawing test. The researchers found an inverse relationship between poor glycemic (blood sugar) Read More …