Category: Children’s Health

Infant Formulas Containing Soy may Adversely Affect Thyroid

According to an article appearing in the New Zealand Medical Journal (volume 113 (1103):24-6, Feb 11, 2000), consumption of high levels of soy products may have an adverse effect on the thyroid. The group that the author was most concerned about was infants who are fed soy formula on a daily basis. The author stated Read More …

Colds in Childhood May Prevent Allergies and Asthma

According to the British Medical Journal, (February 17, 2001; 322: 390-395) it is a good thing when a baby gets a cold. Colds and minor infections seem to help the immune system to develop and help to prevent asthma and allergies latter in life. The finding supports a theory that an immune system that has Read More …

Cleaning Products Linked to Asthma in Children

A study, in the British Medical Association’s journal Thorax, found that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be linked to asthma. Exposure by children to higher levels VOCs caused them to be four times more likely to suffer from asthma than children who were not exposed. The study concerned 88 children who were treated for asthma Read More …

Chemicals in Baby Products

A class of chemicals, called phthalates, is found in baby shampoos, lotions and powders. Phthalates are used to stabilize fragrances and to help make plastics flexible. A recent study, published in the journal Pediatrics (Vol. 121 No. 2 February 2008, pp. e260-e268) found elevated phthalate levels in the urine of babies on whom baby lotion, Read More …

Autism and Nutrition

The Autism Research Institute sponsors Defeat Autism Now! (DAN!) Conferences. Physicians and researchers who are doing progressive work with nutrition and other alternative modalities, gather at these conferences.The FDA has taken the position that there is no effective treatment for autism. DAN! medical professionals and researchers disagree. One small example is the use of vitamin Read More …

Asthma in Children Associated with Diet and Weight

BMI stands for body mass index. It equals a person’s weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. (BMI=kg/m2). It is a number that expresses how overweight a person is. The more overweight a person is, the higher the BMI. A BMI greater than 30 in an adult is considered obese. According to research Read More …

Preschoolers are Getting Obese

Preschoolers are Getting Obese According to pediatric endocrinologists at the University at Buffalo, children as young as three are obese. They have shown that children as young as 10 have abnormal liver function and high insulin levels—possibly leading to type II diabetes. These finding were presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting being held May Read More …

Pain medication can increase the risk for a second bout of heart failure

Pain Medication Can Increase the Risk of a Second Bout of Heart Failure Popular anti-inflammatory, pain-killing drugs (called NSAIDs—or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) may increase the risk of relapse in patients with heart failure according to a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine (February 11, 2002;162:265-270). NSAIDs, a group of drugs that includes aspirin Read More …

Nutrition Learning and Behavior

The Appleton Central Alternative High School in Appleton, Wisconsin was established in 1996 for “problem” students that did not fit well into a traditional high school setting. Students were described as “rude, obnoxious, and ill-mannered” by their own dean of students. Problems with discipline were severe enough that a policeman had to be on campus Read More …

Has Ritalin Been Effectively Tested?

An article appearing in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (2001 Nov 27;165(11):1475-88) did a meta-analysis of all of the research done on methylphenidate use in subjects under the age of 18 (Ritalin is a brand name, methylphenidate is the chemical name) between 1981 and 1999. The authors searched several electronic sources for articles published between Read More …