Category: Allergies

Infants who breast feed have less eczema

Normally you have between 4 and 7 pounds of bacteria in your colon. Normal and well-balanced bacteria have many beneficial functions. Beneficial bacteria do the following: Produce vitamins like folic acid and B12. Nourish the lining of the colon by feeding on vegetable fiber and producing butyric acid. Adequate butyric acid levels reduce the chances Read More …

Infants have fewer allergies if not given milk

Infants fed non-human breast milk before the age of four months have an increased chance of suffering from allergies and asthma according to a study published in the British Medical Journal (September 25, 1999;319:815-819). Researchers followed over 2,000 children from birth through age six. Children given milk before the age of four months (not human Read More …

Homeopathy May be Beneficial for Allergies

In a small study, published in the August 19, 2000 issue of the British Medical Journal, 24 patients were given a homeopathic remedy daily and 27 patients received a placebo. Although it was a small group, the study was double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomized. For four weeks the subjects kept a diary where they recorded their Read More …

GI Flora Affected by Antibiotics—Leading to Allergies

Scientists from the University of Michigan Medical School found with experiments with laboratory mice, that changes in microbes of the GI tract brought on by antibiotic use can affect how the immune system’s response to allergens in the lungs. ”Antibiotics knock out bacteria in the gut, allowing fungi to take over temporarily until the bacteria Read More …

Exposure to Microbes May Decrease the Incidence of Allergies

There is further evidence for the theory that allergies may be due, in part, from living in environments that are too sterile. Some believe that a certain amount of bacterial exposure is good and makes the immune system act more appropriately. The theory is that immune system, when denied bacteria to interact with, will be Read More …

Connection Between Bowel Flora and Allergies

An adult has between six and eight pounds of bacteria in his or her intestines. The total of bacterial cells in the colon is more than the number of cells in the entire body (the bacterial cells are much smaller). The bacteria belong there. The right species of bacteria will produce nutrients, remove toxins, support Read More …

Colds in Childhood May Prevent Allergies and Asthma

According to the British Medical Journal, (February 17, 2001; 322: 390-395) it is a good thing when a baby gets a cold. Colds and minor infections seem to help the immune system to develop and help to prevent asthma and allergies latter in life. The finding supports a theory that an immune system that has Read More …

Antibiotic Use Linked to Asthma and Allergies

Researchers from the University of Michigan Medical School found that, in mice, antibiotics may be responsible for changing the makeup of the bowel flora. A change in bowel flora could affect the way the immune system responds to common allergens in the lungs. According to one of the researchers, antibiotics eliminate bacteria in the GI Read More …

Allergies and Green Tea

According to researchers in Japan there is a substance in green tea that blocks a key cell receptor that helps produce an allergic response. It is called methyleatedepigallocatechingallate(EGCG). It seems to work by works by blocking the production of histamine and immunoglobulin E (IgE). These are two compounds in the body that help create and Read More …

ADHD and Allergies

Research appearing in the journal, Annals of Allergy, May 1994 evaluated 26 children with ADHD. The children were put on an allergy elimination diet. Along with eliminating artificial colors and preservatives, some foods were eliminated. These included common allergens like wheat, dairy products, egg, corn, yeast, soy, citrus, chocolate and peanuts. In addition. Of the Read More …